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Newest Data Shows More Seniors Online

Elder on computerThe latest survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows that 42 percent of individuals 65 years and older actively access the Internet; 53 percent live in a setting with Internet access. The 42 percent stat represents a 50 percent jump in Internet use among this age group since 2000, when only 21 percent of 65+ individuals were actively online.

Older adults are most likely to tap the Web to read e-mail, use a search engine to find information, and access news items. They are less likely to watch online videos or send instant messages, says the U.S. Census Bureau, which gleaned findings from its latest Current Population Survey for October 2009.

“With the increased use of Internet-enabled mobile devices, it remains to be seen how often older adults will start to access the Internet through hand-held mobile devices, and how mobile Internet access will affect how older adults use the Internet,” says a related release from the Administration on Aging (AOA), part of the U.S. Department for Health & Human Services.

Read the AOA report, “Internet Usage and Online Activities of Older Adults.”



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07/20/2010


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Elder on computerThe latest survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows that 42 percent of individuals 65 years and older actively access the Internet; 53 percent live in a setting with Internet access. The 42 percent stat represents a 50 percent jump in Internet use among this age group since 2000, when only 21 percent of 65+ individuals were actively online.

Older adults are most likely to tap the Web to read e-mail, use a search engine to find information, and access news items. They are less likely to watch online videos or send instant messages, says the U.S. Census Bureau, which gleaned findings from its latest Current Population Survey for October 2009.

“With the increased use of Internet-enabled mobile devices, it remains to be seen how often older adults will start to access the Internet through hand-held mobile devices, and how mobile Internet access will affect how older adults use the Internet,” says a related release from the Administration on Aging (AOA), part of the U.S. Department for Health & Human Services.

Read the AOA report, “Internet Usage and Online Activities of Older Adults.”



Feedback

Other Resources


ALFA exchange

07/20/2010


Additional Resources